15 Most Common Birds in Washington State (with Pictures)

Last Updated on December 15, 2022 by Lily Aldrin

When it comes to birding, Washington’s “Evergreen State” is a wonderful location to be.

You have a recipe for a rich and diversified birding habitat when you have locations like the Rocky Mountains, Coast Range, and Puget Sound Lowlands. 

There are many bird species in Washington. Birds of more than 508 different species may be found there.

Many species of birds may be found across the state of Washington, including the American Robin and the Bank Swallow. 

The American Goldfinch is Washington’s state bird, having been designated as such in 1928.

American Goldfinch is a small, delicate bird with a yellow body and black wings. It can be seen all year long in Washington State.

In this article, I will introduce 15 of the most common birds in Washington State.

ImageBird NameFeaturesPrice
Black-headed Grosbeak

Black-headed Grosbeak

  • Scientific Name: Pheucticus melanocephalus
  • Length: 16 – 18 cm (6.3 – 7.1 in)
  • Weight: 28 – 38 g (0.99 – 1.34 oz)
  • Wingspan: 25 – 30 cm (9.8 – 11.8 in)
9.7
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Summer Tanager

Summer Tanager

  • Scientific Name: Piranga rubra
  • Length: 14 – 16 cm (5.5 – 6.3 in)
  • Weight: 22 – 32 g (0.78 – 1.13 oz)
  • Wingspan: 25 – 30 cm (9.8 – 11.8 in)
9.5
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Violet-green Swallow

Violet-green Swallow

  • Scientific Name: Tachycineta thalassina
  • Length: 12 – 13 cm (4.7 – 5.1 in)
  • Weight: 9 – 15 g (0.32 – 0.53 oz)
  • Wingspan: 22 – 25 cm (8.7 – 9.8 in)
9.1
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White-crowned Sparrow

White-crowned Sparrow

  • Scientific Name: Zonotrichia leucophrys
  • Length: 16 – 18 cm (6.3 – 7.1 in)
  • Weight: 20 – 30 g (0.71 – 1.06 oz)
  • Wingspan: 25 – 29 cm (9.8 – 11.4 in)
8.8
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Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing

  • Scientific Name: Bombycilla cedrorum
  • Length: 15 – 17 cm (5.9 – 6.7 in)
  • Weight: 19 – 30 g (0.67 – 1.06 oz)
  • Wingspan: 25 – 29 cm (9.8 – 11.4 in)
8.6
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Gray Jay

Gray Jay

  • Scientific Name: Perisoreus canadensis
  • Length: 22 – 30 cm (8.7 – 11.8 in)
  • Weight: 60 – 100 g (2.1 – 3.5 oz)
  • Wingspan: 33 – 40 cm (13 – 15.7 in)
8.2
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Anna’s Hummingbird

Anna’s Hummingbird

  • Scientific Name: Calypte anna
  • Length: 10 – 12 cm (3.9 – 4.7 in)
  • Weight: 3 – 5 g (0.11 – 0.18 oz)
  • Wingspan: 15 – 17 cm (5.9 – 6.7 in)
8
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Rusty Blackbird

Rusty Blackbird

  • Scientific Name: Euphagus carolinus
  • Length: 22 - 24 cm (8.7 - 9.4 in)
  • Weight: 45 - 70 g (1.6 - 2.5 oz)
  • Wingspan: 45 - 70 g (1.6 - 2.5 oz)
7.7
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Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

  • Scientific Name: Certhia americana
  • Length: 12 – 14 cm (4.7 – 5.5 in)
  • Weight: 10 – 15 g (0.35 – 0.53 oz)
  • Wingspan: 20 – 22 cm (7.9 – 8.7 in)
7.4
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Tricoloured Blackbird

Tricoloured Blackbird

  • Scientific Name: Agelaius tricolor
  • Length: 8 – 9 inches
  • Weight: 1.4 – 1.8 ounces
  • Wingspan: 11 – 12 inches
7.2
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American Robin

American Robin

  • Scientific Name: Turdus migratorius
  • Length: 9 – 11 inches
  • Weight: 1.6 – 3.5 ounces
  • Wingspan: 12 – 15 inches
9.5
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American Crow

American Crow

  • Scientific Name: Corvus brachyrhynchos
  • Length: 16 – 21 inches
  • Weight: 12 – 30 ounces
  • Wingspan: 33 – 40 inches
9.5
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American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

  • Scientific Name: Spinus tristis
  • Length: 4.7 - 5.5 inches
  • Weight: 0.4 - 0.6 ounces
  • Wingspan: 7.9 - 9.8 inches
9.5
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European Starling

European Starling

  • Scientific Name: Sturnus vulgaris
  • Length: 8.3 – 9.8 inches
  • Weight: 1.4 – 3.3 ounces
  • Wingspan: 16.5 – 18.5 inches
9.5
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Black-capped Chickadee

Black-capped Chickadee

  • Scientific Name: Poecile atricapillus
  • Length: 4.3 – 5.1 inches
  • Weight: 0.4 – 0.6 ounces
  • Wingspan: 7.5 – 8.7 inches
9.5
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If you don’t have the time to read the whole article, check out this video for a quick understanding.

Most Common Birds in Washington

1. Black-headed Grosbeak

black headed grosbeak

Male Grosbeaks (Pheucticus melanocephalus) have black backs, tiny black-and-white wings, and long black-and-white tails that are mostly white at the tip.

On their mostly white underside, they have partially orange rumps with an orange patch. As the coloring advances, the underbelly turns completely orange.

These birds have black cheeks and a large, curved black beak that set them apart. Because of their brown rather than black feathering, the female or juvenile Grosbeak has an orange breast and orange underbelly.

The Black-headed Grosbeak is a medium-sized bird, measuring about 7.5 to 8.7 inches in length and weighing about 1.1 to 1.5 ounces.

It has a wingspan of 11.8 to 13.8 inches.

The Black-headed Grosbeak is found in a variety of habitats, including forests, woodlands, and riparian areas. It is especially common in areas with oak trees.

When you’re out trekking, keep your eyes out for a Black-headed Grosbeak.

The Black-headed Grosbeak feeds on a variety of seeds, fruits, and insects. It is particularly fond of acorns and other nuts, and will often store them for later use.

The Black-headed Grosbeak builds a cup-shaped nest in a tree or shrub, using materials such as grasses, twigs, and plant fibers.

The female lays a clutch of three to four eggs, which she incubates for about two weeks.

Below are the characteristics of the Black-headed Grosbeak,

Scientific Name Pheucticus melanocephalus
Length 16 – 18 cm (6.3 – 7.1 in)
Weight 28 – 38 g (0.99 – 1.34 oz)
Wingspan 25 – 30 cm (9.8 – 11.8 in)
Habitat Forests and wooded areas
Food Seeds, fruits, insects, and nectar
Nesting Open cup nest in trees or shrubs
Behavior Sociable and often found in pairs

2. Summer Tanager

Summer Tanager

The Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra) is a medium-sized songbird in the cardinal family, Cardinalidae.

It is native to the eastern and central United States, as well as parts of Mexico and Central America.

The Summer Tanager is a colorful bird, with a bright red body and wings, and a black head and tail.

It measures about 7 to 8 inches in length and weighs about 1.2 to 1.5 ounces.

It has a wingspan of about 10.5 to 12.5 inches.

The Summer Tanager is found in a variety of habitats, including forests, woodlands, and suburban areas.

It is especially common in areas with oak and pine trees.

The Summer Tanager feeds mainly on insects and other invertebrates, such as beetles, grasshoppers, and caterpillars.

It will also eat fruits, berries, and seeds, especially in the fall and winter.

The Summer Tanager builds a cup-shaped nest in a tree or shrub, using materials such as grasses, plant fibers, and animal hair.

The female lays a clutch of three to four eggs, which she incubates for about two weeks.

Below are the characteristics of the Summer Tanager,

Scientific Name Piranga rubra
Length 14 – 16 cm (5.5 – 6.3 in)
Weight 22 – 32 g (0.78 – 1.13 oz)
Wingspan 25 – 30 cm (9.8 – 11.8 in)
Habitat Wooded areas, forests, and gardens
Food Insects and fruit
Nesting Open cup nest in trees
Behavior Solitary or in pairs during breeding season, often found in flocks during non-breeding season

3. Violet-green Swallow

violet-green swallow

The Violet-green Swallow (Tachycineta thalassina) is a small bird in the swallow family, Hirundinidae.

It is native to North America and is commonly found in the western United States and Canada.

Violet-green Swallows have greenbacks with purple on the lower back and bronze on the upper back.

They have long, pointed grey wings with a little purple mixed in, as well as some green and blue near the shoulder. 

The stomach and breast of this bird are a beautiful pure white, and the tails are short purple and grey with a little fork.

In addition, the bird’s face is mainly white, save for some grey in front of the eyes and a green cap that runs down to the nape of its neck. 

The beak of these birds is tiny and triangular. However, females will have greyish-brown heads and backs, along with ducky coloration on their cheeks.

Read:  8 Popular Birds with Big Beaks

The Violet-green Swallow is a small, slim bird, measuring about 4.7 to 5.9 inches in length and weighing about 0.4 to 0.6 ounces.

It has a wingspan of about 7.9 to 9.8 inches.

The Violet-green Swallow is typically found in open woodlands, parks, and gardens, especially near water.

It is also common in rural and suburban areas.

The Violet-green Swallow feeds on insects, which it catches in flight.

Its diet consists mainly of flies, beetles, and wasps, but it will also eat other insects and spiders.

The Violet-green Swallow builds a cup-shaped nest out of mud and plant fibers, which it attaches to a vertical surface such as a cliff face or the side of a building.

The female lays a clutch of four to six eggs, which she incubates for about two weeks.

Below are the characteristics of the Violet-green Swallow,

Scientific Name Tachycineta thalassina
Length 12 – 13 cm (4.7 – 5.1 in)
Weight 9 – 15 g (0.32 – 0.53 oz)
Wingspan 22 – 25 cm (8.7 – 9.8 in)
Habitat Open forests, woodlands, and parks
Food Insects and spiders
Nesting Open cup nest in cavities or on ledges
Behavior Highly social, often found in large flocks

4. White-crowned Sparrow

White-crowned Sparrow

The White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys) is a medium-sized bird in the sparrow family, Passerellidae.

It is native to North America and is commonly found in the western and central United States, as well as parts of Canada and Mexico.

White-crowned Sparrows have dark backs with streaks and two tiny white wing bars on each wing.

Their tails are long and dark, with a white rump and a warm brown underbelly that fades to grey as the coloring goes up and towards the breast.

The grey coloring extends over the bird’s long, thick grey neck and ends just below the eyes, where a narrow, black eye stripe may be seen.

White coloring appears above this, followed by another black stripe and white at the crown.

Short, sturdy, triangular orange bills characterize these birds.

It measures about 6 to 7.5 inches in length and weighs about 1 to 1.4 ounces.

It has a wingspan of about 9.8 to 11.8 inches.

The White-crowned Sparrow is found in a variety of habitats, including forests, woodlands, grasslands, and suburban areas.

It is especially common in areas with dense vegetation, such as thickets and brush piles.

The White-crowned Sparrow feeds on a variety of seeds, fruits, and insects.

Below are the characteristics of the White-crowned Sparrow,

Scientific Name Zonotrichia leucophrys
Length 16 – 18 cm (6.3 – 7.1 in)
Weight 20 – 30 g (0.71 – 1.06 oz)
Wingspan 25 – 29 cm (9.8 – 11.4 in)
Habitat Open woodlands, scrublands, and gardens
Food Seeds, fruits, and insects
Nesting Open cup nest on the ground or in shrubs and bushes
Behavior Sociable and often found in flocks

5. Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing

The Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) is a medium-sized bird in the waxwing family, Bombycillidae. It is native to North America and is commonly found in the United States and Canada.

The tops of their backs are light brown, while the bottoms are grey.

They have tiny grey wings with brown shoulders and a waxy-red arrangement of vertical lines that resembles a pan-pipe, as well as a white line at the wing’s inner terminal. 

They have short, squared grey tails with yellow ends and a white rump, as well as a yellow underside.

This yellow extends up the breast, turning brown at the top part, and the birds’ faces are mainly brown. 

Unusual features of their appearance include up-curving black masks with a hint of color on either side of the eyes, as well as brown “beards” that extend into the breast.

It measures about 6 to 7 inches in length and weighs about 0.9 to 1.2 ounces.

It has a wingspan of about 10 to 11.8 inches.

The Cedar Waxwing is found in a variety of habitats, including forests, woodlands, and suburban areas. It is especially common in areas with fruit-bearing trees and shrubs.

The Cedar Waxwing feeds on a variety of fruits, berries, and insects.

It is especially fond of cedar berries, which give it its name.

It will also eat other fruits, such as apples, cherries, and berries, as well as insects such as flies and beetles.

The Cedar Waxwing builds a cup-shaped nest out of grasses, plant fibers, and other materials, which it often lines with feathers.

The female lays a clutch of three to five eggs, which she incubates for about two weeks.

Below are the characteristics of the Cedar Waxwing,

Scientific Name Bombycilla cedrorum
Length 15 – 17 cm (5.9 – 6.7 in)
Weight 19 – 30 g (0.67 – 1.06 oz)
Wingspan 25 – 29 cm (9.8 – 11.4 in)
Habitat Wooded areas, forests, and gardens
Food Berries and insects
Nesting Open cup nest in trees or shrubs
Behavior Highly social, often found in large flocks

6. Gray Jay

gray jay

The Gray Jay (Perisoreus canadensis), also known as the Canada Jay, is a small bird in the crow family, Corvidae. It is native to North America.

Gray Jay has dark gray backs, short dark grey wings, and long grey tails with white ends and lighter coloration on the undersides.

This bird’s underside and breast are also a lighter grey; however, there is a white ‘V at the top of the breast that runs down from the face.

The grey hue originating from the rear of the eyes and fanning out across the back of the skull gives these birds a snowy white appearance.

Short, thick, triangular black bills characterize these birds.

It measures about 9.8 to 11 inches in length and weighs about 2.1 to 2.9 ounces.

It has a wingspan of about 18 to 21 inches.

The Gray Jay is found in the coniferous forests of the boreal region, where it is well-adapted to the cold, harsh climate.

It is also found in some subalpine and alpine habitats.

The Gray Jay feeds on a variety of foods, including fruits, berries, insects, small mammals, and bird eggs.

It is especially fond of pine nuts, and will often cache food for later use.

The Gray Jay builds a cup-shaped nest out of twigs, plant fibers, and other materials, which it often lines with feathers.

The female lays a clutch of two to five eggs, which she incubates for about three weeks.

Below are the characteristics of the Gray Jay,

Scientific Name Perisoreus canadensis
Length 22 – 30 cm (8.7 – 11.8 in)
Weight 60 – 100 g (2.1 – 3.5 oz)
Wingspan 33 – 40 cm (13 – 15.7 in)
Habitat Coniferous forests and woodlands
Food Insects, berries, and carrion
Nesting Open cup nest in trees or cavities
Behavior Highly social and often found in pairs or family groups

7. Anna’s Hummingbird

Anna Hummingbird

Anna’s Hummingbird (Calypte anna) is a small bird native to North America.

It is named after Anna Masséna, Duchess of Rivoli.

The backs of Anna’s Hummingbirds are grey and green, with yellow above and below their short, curved grey wings.

They have broad grey tails with green and yellow highlights, as well as white on the rump of this bird.

It has a greenish-grey underbelly and a white and grey breast on its upper side, with a yellow border and a white and grey breast top.

As well as having a bright, neon pink beneath the cheekbones and toward the back and top of the head on their reddish-grey faces, these birds also have green, yellow, and blue spots all over them as well.

It is a bird with a golden eyebrow line and a long, narrow, straight beak with a black coloration.

In terms of size, Anna’s Hummingbirds are small birds, with an average length of 3 – 3.5 inches (7.6 – 8.9 cm) and an average weight of 0.1 – 0.2 ounces (2.8 – 5.6 grams).

Their wingspan is typically around 4 – 5 inches (10 -12.7 cm), and they have a rapid and agile flight style, which is characteristic of hummingbirds.

The desert scrub and forest margins (especially those with water nearby), parks, and even residential streets are good places to find Anna’s Hummingbirds.

In the event that you have flowers in your yard, this is an added bonus. However, even without flowers, you may still have a visit.

Make a small gesture to demonstrate that you care by leaving something out!

Anna’s Hummingbirds feed primarily on nectar from flowers, using their long, curved beaks to access the nectar.

Read:  Can Birds Eat Grapes? Do Birds Eat Grapes?

They also eat insects and spiders for protein, which they catch in mid-air or glean from plants.

Below are the characteristics of the Anna’s Hummingbird,

Scientific Name Calypte anna
Length 10 – 12 cm (3.9 – 4.7 in)
Weight 3 – 5 g (0.11 – 0.18 oz)
Wingspan 15 – 17 cm (5.9 – 6.7 in)
Habitat Woodlands, gardens, and urban areas
Food Nectar from flowers and insects
Nesting Compact cup nest made of plant down and spider webs
Behavior Territorial and aggressive during breeding season, solitary or in loose flocks during non-breeding season

8. Rusty Blackbird

Rusty blackbird
Credits – Wikipedia

The Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus) is a medium-sized passerine bird native to North America.

It is a member of the family Icteridae, which includes other blackbirds, orioles, and meadowlarks.

In the summer, the Rusty Blackbird has medium-length wings and long, thin tails, just like a typical blackbird.

However, you will see yellowish eyes, and the bird’s coloring will change dramatically once winter arrives.

The upper back and breasts have a rusty tint and the face has a diamond-shaped black mask.

The beak of these birds is long, straight, and pointed black.

Females will be a combination of browns and greys, with some rust coloring in the winter, while males will be a much glossy black during the breeding season.

In terms of size, Rusty Blackbirds are medium-sized birds, with an average length of 7 – 8.5 inches (17.8 – 21.6 cm) and an average weight of 0.7 – 1.1 ounces (19.8 – 31.2 grams).

Their wingspan is typically around 11 – 12 inches (27.9 – 30.5 cm), and they have a strong, direct flight style.

In terms of habitat, Rusty Blackbirds are typically found in a variety of wetland habitats, including marshes, swamps, and flooded forests.

They are most commonly found in the eastern half of North America, although they also occur in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska.

Rusty Blackbirds feed on a variety of foods, including insects, spiders, snails, berries, and seeds.

They forage by gleaning food from the ground or by catching insects in mid-air.

In terms of nesting, Rusty Blackbirds typically build their nests in wetland habitats, such as marshes or swamps.

The female builds the nest out of grasses, twigs, and mud, and lays 4 – 5 eggs, which she incubates for about two weeks.

The chicks hatch and remain in the nest for another two weeks before fledging.

Below are the characteristics of the Rusty Blackbird,

Scientific Name Euphagus carolinus
Length 22-24 cm (8.7-9.4 in)
Weight 45-70 g (1.6-2.5 oz)
Wingspan 30-35 cm (11.8-13.8 in)
Habitat Wetland, forested, and agricultural areas
Food Insects and seeds
Nesting Open cup nest in trees or shrubs
Behavior Often found in flocks during winter and migration, solitary or in pairs during breeding season

9. Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

The Brown Creeper (Certhia americana) is a small passerine bird native to North America.

It is a member of the family Certhiidae

Black-and-white stripes run at the tips of the medium-length wings of Brown Creepers.

On the underside and breast of this bird is a creamy-tan border, and its long, thin streaked tails are pure white. 

The upper parts of their heads are brown and white striped for better mixing, and there is a buffy stripe above the eyes.

Brown Creepers have long, curved, black or black-and-yellow bills.

In terms of size, Brown Creepers are small birds, with an average length of 4.5 – 5.5 inches (11.4 – 14 cm) and an average weight of 0.3 – 0.5 ounces (8.5 – 14.2 grams).

Their wingspan is typically around 7 – 8 inches (17.8 – 20.3 cm), and they have a weak, fluttering flight style.

In terms of habitat, Brown Creepers are typically found in a variety of forested habitats, including coniferous and deciduous forests.

They are most commonly found in the eastern half of North America, although they also occur in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska.

Brown Creepers feed on insects and spiders, which they glean from tree bark.

They use their long, curved beaks to probe into crevices in the bark to access their prey.

In terms of nesting, Brown Creepers typically build their nests in tree cavities or under loose bark.

The female builds the nest out of plant materials, such as moss and leaves, and lays 5 – 8 eggs, which she incubates for about two weeks.

Below are the characteristics of the Brown Creeper,

Scientific Name Certhia americana
Length 12 – 14 cm (4.7 – 5.5 in)
Weight 10 – 15 g (0.35 – 0.53 oz)
Wingspan 20 – 22 cm (7.9 – 8.7 in)
Habitat Coniferous and deciduous forests
Food Insects and spiders
Nesting Compact cup nest made of plant material and spider webs
Behavior Solitary, often found creeping up tree trunks in search of food

10. Tricoloured Blackbird

Tricoloured Blackbird

The Tricolored Blackbird (Agelaius tricolor) is a medium-sized passerine bird native to North America.

It is a member of the family Icteridae, which includes other blackbirds, orioles, and meadowlarks.

It’s easy to identify male Tricolored Blackbirds because of their white and red shoulder markings, which look like white shark fins with red tips when the large wings are at rest.

Female Tricolors will have a longer, notched black tail than male Tricolors. 

They’re dark with a cream-colored brow line and highly streaked bellies.

The black beak of these birds is thick, pointed, and medium in length.

Male juveniles are easily identifiable because they are a combination of browns and blacks, with the brown gradually diminishing as they mature.

In terms of size, Tricolored Blackbirds are medium-sized birds, with an average length of 7 – 8.5 inches (17.8 – 21.6 cm) and an average weight of 0.7 – 1.1 ounces (19.8 – 31.2 grams).

Their wingspan is typically around 11 – 12 inches (27.9 – 30.5 cm), and they have a strong, direct flight style.

In terms of habitat, Tricolored Blackbirds are typically found in wetland habitats, such as marshes, swamps, and flooded meadows.

They are most commonly found in the Central Valley of California, although they also occur in other parts of the west coast.

Tricolored Blackbirds feed on a variety of foods, including insects, spiders, snails, berries, and seeds.

They forage by gleaning food from the ground or by catching insects in mid-air.

Below are the characteristics of the Tricoloured Blackbird,

Scientific Name Agelaius tricolor
Length 8 – 9 inches
Weight 1.4 – 1.8 ounces
Wingspan 11 – 12 inches
Habitat Grasslands and wetlands
Food Insects, seeds, and fruits
Nesting Builds cup-shaped nests in trees or shrubs
Behavior Sociable and gregarious, often found in large flocks

11. American Robin

American Robin

The American Robin (Turdus migratorius) is a large passerine bird native to North America. It is a member of the family Turdidae.

The backs of American Robins are greyish-brown, with medium-length greyish-brown wings and long greyish-brown tails.

The underside and breast of this bird are a rich orange color, while the rump is white. 

This bird has a medium-length, moderately curved yellow beak and a black head with a ‘broken’ white eyeing.

There will be a lighter hue to the females’ heads compared to their backs and wings.

In terms of size, American Robins are medium-sized birds, with an average length of 9 – 11 inches (22.9 – 27.9 cm) and an average weight of 2.3 – 3.4 ounces (65.2 – 96.4 grams).

Their wingspan is typically around 12 – 14 inches (30.5 – 35.6 cm).

American Robins are found in a variety of habitats, including forests, parks, gardens, and urban areas.

They are common throughout North America, from Alaska and Canada to Mexico and Central America.

American Robins feed on a variety of foods, including fruits, berries, insects, and worms.

They forage on the ground, often turning over leaves to access their prey.

Below are the characteristics of the American Robin,

Scientific Name Turdus migratorius
Length 9 – 11 inches
Weight 1.6 – 3.5 ounces
Wingspan 12 – 15 inches
Habitat Forests, gardens, and urban areas
Food Insects, fruits, and berries
Nesting Builds cup-shaped nests in trees or shrubs
Behavior Sociable and gregarious, often found in large flocks

12. American Crow

American Crow

The American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) is a large passerine bird native to North America.

It is a member of the family Corvidae, which includes other crows, jays, and magpies.

Read:  20 Common Birds in North Carolina (with Pictures)

American Crows are both smart and easily identifiable, as they are totally black from head to toe.

Wings that are large and rounded, and short, squared-off tails.

Their bills are long and straight, with a notable curve in the top bill. 

These birds are usually black, with the exception of molting when they become feathers.

American Crows are large birds, with an average length of 17 – 21 inches (43 – 53 cm) and an average weight of 13 – 21 ounces (369 – 595 grams).

Their wingspan is typically around 30 – 40 inches (76 – 102 cm).

American Crows are found in a variety of habitats, including forests, fields, and urban areas.

They are common throughout most of North America, from southern Canada to Mexico and the Caribbean.

American Crows feed on a wide variety of foods, including insects, fruits, seeds, nuts, and human refuse.

They are opportunistic feeders and will eat whatever is readily available.

American Crows typically build their nests in trees or shrubs.

The female builds the nest out of sticks and twigs and lays 3 – 8 eggs, which she incubates for about two weeks.

The chicks hatch and remain in the nest for another four to five weeks before fledging.

Below are the characteristics of the American Crow,

Scientific Name Corvus brachyrhynchos
Length 16 – 21 inches
Weight 12 – 30 ounces
Wingspan 33 – 40 inches
Habitat Forests, fields, and urban areas
Food Omnivorous, feeds on insects, fruits, seeds, and carrion
Nesting Builds large, sturdy nests in trees or on man-made structures
Behavior Intelligent and adaptable, often seen using tools and exhibiting complex social behavior

13. American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

The American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) is a small passerine bird native to North America.

It is a member of the family Fringillidae, which includes other finches.

Male American Goldfinches have brilliant yellowbacks and long, black wings with two white wing bars and a number of white markings in the middle of the inner wing.

They feature white markings on their short, notched tails, as well as white on the undersides of their rump. 

This bird has a brilliant yellow underside and breast, as well as a tiny black cap on its forehead and a medium-length, conical orange beak.

Females will be olive-colored rather than black, with duller yellows, and both genders will be dull brown with hardly discernible wing bars in the winter.

In terms of size, American Goldfinches are small birds, with an average length of 4.5 – 5.5 inches (11.4 – 14 cm) and an average weight of 0.4 – 0.6 ounces (11.3 – 17 grams).

Their wingspan is typically around 6 – 8 inches (15 – 20 cm), and they have a quick, agile flight style.

In terms of habitat, American Goldfinches are found in a variety of habitats, including meadows, fields, and gardens.

They are common throughout most of North America, from southern Canada to Mexico and the Caribbean.

American Goldfinches feed primarily on seeds, especially thistle and sunflower seeds.

They are also known to eat insects, berries, and nectar.

They feed by perching on a plant and using their conical beak to remove the seeds.

American Goldfinches typically build their nests in trees or shrubs.

The female builds the nest out of plant material, such as twigs and feathers, and lays 4 – 6 eggs, which she incubates for about two weeks.

Below are the characteristics of the American Goldfinch,

Scientific Name Spinus tristis
Length 4.7-5.5 inches
Weight 0.4-0.6 ounces
Wingspan 7.9-9.8 inches
Habitat Open woodlands, fields, and gardens
Food Seeds, fruits, and insects
Nesting Builds cup-shaped nests in trees or shrubs
Behavior Sociable and gregarious, often found in large flocks

14. European Starling

European Starling

The European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) is a medium-sized passerine bird native to Europe, Asia, and Africa. 

It was introduced to North America in the late 19th century, and is now found throughout most of the continent.

While European Starlings appear black from afar, up close, you can see that their summer plumage is actually a mix of purples and greens.

On the face of these birds are a large golden beak and a pair of long, pointed wings with short tails.

They molt into new brown plumage with gorgeous white markings in the winter, and it’s really worth looking at.

In terms of size, European Starlings are medium-sized birds, with an average length of 7 – 8.5 inches (17.8 – 21.6 cm) and an average weight of 1 – 1.6 ounces (28.3 – 45.4 grams).

Their wingspan is typically around 12 – 14 inches (30.5 – 35.6 cm)

European Starlings are found in a variety of habitats, including forests, fields, and urban areas.

They are common throughout most of North America, from southern Canada to northern Mexico.

European Starlings feed on a wide variety of foods, including insects, fruits, seeds, and human refuse.

European Starlings typically build their nests in cavities or crevices, such as in trees, buildings, or bird boxes.

The female builds the nest out of grasses, mud, and feathers, and lays 4 – 6 eggs, which she incubates for about two weeks.

Below are the characteristics of the European Starling,

Scientific Name Sturnus vulgaris
Length 8.3 – 9.8 inches
Weight 1.4 – 3.3 ounces
Wingspan 16.5 – 18.5 inches
Habitat Open woodlands, fields, and urban areas
Food Omnivorous, feeds on insects, fruits, seeds, and carrion
Nesting Builds large, messy nests in trees or on man-made structures
Behavior Gregarious and adaptable, often seen in large flocks

15. Black-capped Chickadee

Black-capped Chickadee

The black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla) is a small bird native to North America.

Black-capped Chickadees have grey backs, short grey wings with white borders in the feathers, and long grey tails with white outer feathers.

A white underbelly and breast, with buff flanking on the sides, a black bib, a large white stripe extending from the cheeks to the back of their heads, and a huge black cap that reaches mid-eye level are the distinguishing characteristics.

These birds also have tiny black bills that are trapezoidal in shape.

In terms of length, black-capped chickadees are about 4.5 to 6 inches long.

They typically weigh between 0.35 and 0.6 ounces.

Their wingspan is typically around 8 inches.

Chickadee sightings are likely to occur in marshes, fields, and practically any other location with trees and shrub cover. They also stop by the backyard every now and again, so leave a little stuff out and you could get a visit.

Black-capped chickadees are omnivorous birds, meaning that they eat both plants and animals.

They primarily feed on insects, seeds, and berries.

They are known to eat a variety of insects, including caterpillars, beetles, and aphids.

They also eat seeds from a variety of plants, including sunflowers, alders, and maples.

In the winter, they often feed on berries from shrubs and trees, such as juniper, mountain ash, and dogwood.

They are also known to visit bird feeders for seeds and suet.

Below are the characteristics of the Black-capped Chickadee,

Scientific Name Poecile atricapillus
Length 4.3 – 5.1 inches
Weight 0.4 – 0.6 ounces
Wingspan 7.5 – 8.7 inches
Habitat Coniferous and deciduous forests
Food Insects, seeds, and berries
Nesting Builds cup-shaped nests in tree cavities or nest boxes
Behavior Sociable and gregarious, often seen in small flocks

Conclusion

I took some time today to investigate Washington’s birding scene. 

There are enough bird species to keep you busy for a long time in this region.

Just remember to fill those feeders, and because the winters are harsh, a heated birdbath is a good idea as well. 

In Washington, one thing is certain: whether you’re going out to see them or trying to entice them into your backyard, one thing is definite.

There are plenty of lovely birds to view.

To Conclude, These are the Most Common Washington Birds:

  1. Black-headed Grosbeak
  2. Summer Tanager
  3. Violet-green Swallow
  4. White-crowned Sparrow
  5. Cedar Waxwing
  6. Gray Jay
  7. Anna’s Hummingbird
  8. Rusty Blackbird
  9. Brown Creeper
  10. Tricolored Blackbird
  11. American Robin
  12. American Crow
  13. America Goldfinch
  14. European Starling
  15. Black-capped Chickadee

FAQ

What is Washington's state bird?

Although the goldfinch, a beautiful tiny bird with a yellow body and black wings, was chosen as the official state bird, many other species were considered.

In 1928, legislators gave schoolchildren the opportunity to choose the state bird, and the meadowlark came out on top.

About Lily Aldrin

I am Lily Aldrin. I attended Cornell University, where I obtained my degree to become an Ornithologist so I could pursue my love of these magnificent creatures in and out of their natural habitats.